Reports, Agriculture

The Politics of Knowledge: Understanding the Evidence for Agroecology, Regenerative Approaches, and Indigenous Foodways

6 December 2021

The compendium The Politics of Knowledge: Understanding the Evidence for Agroecology, Regenerative Approaches, and Indigenous Foodways tackles the dominant questions about evidence that are holding back food systems transformation. Authors unpack the narratives and legacies behind these questions and explore the many ways funders, researchers, and policymakers can take transformative action.

Visit this multimedia interactive for a summary of the report, featuring case studies, stories, video, and audio from around the world.

Working with 17 contributing teams representing geographic, institutional, sectoral, gender, and racial diversity, the compendium explores the power and politics that shape and infuse our understanding of evidence, what counts as evidence, and the broad range of ways evidence is documented.

Alongside recommendations for action, authors focus on unpacking five dominant questions:

  1. Can these approaches feed the world?
  2. Can these approaches be scaled?
  3. Can these approaches provide meaningful livelihoods?
  4. Can these approaches solve the climate, biodiversity, and soils crises?
  5. Can these approaches accelerate transformation?

Translated versions of The Politics of Knowledge‘s key messages are available in: French and Spanish.