Announcing a new Global Alliance impact area: climate resilience


The Global Alliance is eager to announce that in addition to our three impact areas – agroecology, health and well-being, and true cost accounting – we are establishing a fourth impact area on climate resilience to help build a collective global case for transforming food systems in the face of climate change and for a reduction of up to 30% in food-systems-related greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

For us, climate resilience reflects both adaptation (to change) and mitigation (of impacts of change) as necessary attributes of a resilient system. As such, we will take nuanced, integrated approaches at the local, regional, and global levels, recognizing the interrelationships between health, food security, climate adaptation and climate mitigation, land rights and human rights goals, particularly in light of the uneven burden of climate change impacts on low-income countries and vulnerable populations.

Through our work on climate resilience, we aim to establish a connected and coordinated philanthropic network informed by diverse perspectives in order to amplify our collective voice and reach on the global stage. We aim to assess issues, potential solutions and strategic pathways for addressing the climate threat through changes in agricultural practices and the global food system; and facilitate input into major international governance processes informed by strategic convenings with state climate negotiators, NGOs, academics, farmers and practitioners, philanthropists, and multilateral institutions, to move the agenda forward.

“We need to take action on climate change to secure future food security. And this means that food, agriculture, consumers and producers need to be central to the discussions, agreements, and actions that we take.”

This explicit focus on climate resilience is a natural evolution from the Global Alliance’s 2nd International Dialogue: The Future of Food in a Climate Changing World. In the words of Sonja Vermuelen in the associated video, “we need to take action on climate change to secure future food security. And this means that food, agriculture, consumers and producers need to be central to the discussions, agreements, and actions that we take.”

We must start placing food systems more centrally in this critical global agenda as a way to integrate, align, and cohere around the interrelationships between food systems, climate change, demographic shifts, political unrest, and economic vulnerabilities. Food systems are a significant factor in the creation of these massive challenges and – importantly – they can be a brilliant pathway to the solutions. Stay tuned for more in the coming months on our plans and ambitions.